New York City-based photographer Klaus Enrique (previously featured here) created an awesome series of portraits entitled Arcimboldo. The series was inspired by the works of 16th century Italian painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who was best known for creating painted representations of people using things like fruits, vegetables, flowers, and fish arranged in such a way that the objects formed recognizable likenesses of his subjects.

Klaus Enrique does the same thing, only instead of painting his subjects, he arranges actual pieces of fruit, vegetables, flowers, meat, candy, animals, insects, and more to create his portraits. He began by recreating some of Giuseppe Arcimboldo’s paintings using the same objects depicted in the original paintings. Then he expanded his series to include portraits of modern day figures, both real and fictional, like Ghandi, Princess Diana, Darth Vader, and Frankenstein’s Monster.

He explained, “Although most recognize the images immediately as portraits, there are many people who do not. At first they only see the individual parts of the image: the fruits, flowers, and vegetables. But after looking at it for a while, they realize that it’s a portrait of a person. To see that thought process being played out in real time is very satisfying to me because it mimics the thinking behind the art: that simple organic objects come together to create something more meaningful than the sum of its parts.”

Visit Klaus Enrique’s website to view more examples of his surreal and fascinating artwork.

[via Design Taxi]

Take one sort of plant that grows above ground, one that grows below and lots of skill and patience with grafting and, ten years later, you might just get your very own TomTato plant. That’s exactly what the clever folks at British horticultural firm Thompson and Morgan did in order to successfully create an awesome tomato-potato plant hybrid without using any genetic modification.

"Thompson and Morgan director Paul Hansord explains: “It has been very difficult to achieve because the tomato stem and the potato stem have to be the same thickness for the graft to work… It is a very highly skilled operation. We have seen similar products. However, on closer inspection the potato is planted in a pot with a tomato planted in the same pot – our plant is one plant and produces no potato foliage.”

[via Technabob]

Meet Dorothea Clinton, a 73-year-old retiree who lives in Shropshire, England. Dorothea recently had the good fortune (for how could it be anything other than lucky?) of digging up a potato from her garden that bears a remarkable resemblance to a rubber duckie.

"I just pulled it out of the ground and I thought, ‘Oooh, it’s a duck,’" she told Shropshirestar. “We normally eat everything we produce from the garden but I can’t bring myself to eat this one, it’s got a kind of strange sentimental value to me now.”

We’d be smiling too if we managed to grow a potato that looks like an adorable rubber duck. Congratulations Dorothea! The Geyser of Awesome salutes you and your remarkable tater. (And if the next potato she digs up looks anything like a Devil Duckie, we’re going to have to fly to Shropshire to see it in person.)

[via Neatorama]

The 16th World Bodypainting Festival recently took place in Poertschach am Woerthersee, Austria. The spectacular event included awesome artists representing 45 different countries and drew 29,000 visitors.

Visit Design You Trust and the World Bodypainting Festival Facebook page to view many more photos from the event. (Some photos may be NSFW)

Photos 1 - 4 by Didier Messens, photo 5 by Karsten Skrabal, photo 6 by Janis Möckelmann.

[via Design You Trust and the World Bodypainting Festival]

From the Department of Awesome Desserts comes this truly remarkable cake created by Redditor UberPrioritizer’s wife, who works as a baking and pastry teacher at Johnson & Wales University.
The gorgeous fruit and vegetables were sculpted from fondant and gum paste, which must have taken an extraordinary amount of time and care. Even though it already looks too good to eat, we were sorry to learn that this cake isn’t actually edible, but was instead made strictly for display. This means that there isn’t really yummy cake beneath that tantalizing rainbow tower of produce. Don’t bother slicing it. All you’ll find inside is styrofoam.
This magnificent work of cake art is entitled Eat A Rainbow Every Day and you can go can see it in person at The Mint Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina.
[via Neatorama]

From the Department of Awesome Desserts comes this truly remarkable cake created by Redditor UberPrioritizer’s wife, who works as a baking and pastry teacher at Johnson & Wales University.

The gorgeous fruit and vegetables were sculpted from fondant and gum paste, which must have taken an extraordinary amount of time and care. Even though it already looks too good to eat, we were sorry to learn that this cake isn’t actually edible, but was instead made strictly for display. This means that there isn’t really yummy cake beneath that tantalizing rainbow tower of produce. Don’t bother slicing it. All you’ll find inside is styrofoam.

This magnificent work of cake art is entitled Eat A Rainbow Every Day and you can go can see it in person at The Mint Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina.

[via Neatorama]

These gorgeous dresses are part of an awesome series entitled Wearable Foods. Created by Korean artist Yeonju Sung, each of these beautiful garments was elaborately made of edible materials such as red peppers, eggplants, bananas, green onions, lotus roots, white radishes, tomatoes, and red cabbage. The bottom two pieces are made of bubble gum.

While one may categorically define Sung’s good-enough-to-eat collection as sculptural foodwear, it is just as much a photographic series. The artist explains, “I create my own world of reality by generating a completely different set of images that contradict the conventional notion of food and clothes. As time goes by, the food from my work do go through a progression of disappearance due to the nature of food and gets gradually changed into the hideous state fading its shape and color in the process…”

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more tantalizing edible couture from Yeonju Sung’s Wearable Foods series.

For a series of photos entitled Hunger Pains, New York-based photographer Ted Sabarese dressed his models in foods they were personally craving: bread, pasta, meat, vegetables, fruit and, our personal favourite, waffle pants.

The Geyser of Awesome salutes anyone who not only loves waffles so much that they’d wear them as a garment, but also be able to pull off the wearing off them with as much style as the beautifully-bearded model photographed by Ted SabareseWe are impressed and hungry. We’d gladly take a serving of what each one of these models is wearing. (Followed by seconds of the waffles.)

[via Design Taxi]

Chinese artist Liu Bolin (previously featured here), master of creative camouflage and real-life invisible man, has returned with a new series of photos entitled Hiding in the City, currently on exhibition at the Galerie Paris-Beijing in Paris through March 10, 2013.

If you aren’t already familiar with Liu Bolin's awesome artwork, you should know that there are no post-production tricks used to create these images. The artist is able to hide himself within these urban scenes thanks to a talented team of assistants who reference photos of the areas behind him when painting him from head-to-toe so that he seems to disappear completely into the background, no matter what that background might be. 

“My intention was not to disappear in the environment but instead to let the environment take possession of me”, he says. Bolin’s intent is not to simply hide himself as an individual but suggests the works are statement regarding damage caused by economic and urban development. 

[via My Modern Metropolis and Colossal]