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29 posts tagged Wings

Most guinea pigs spend their days simply being impossibly cute and eating as many vegetables and as much hay as they possibly can. Pulguinha the Steampunk Guinea Pig does all of those things while wearing an awesome pair of brass and leather wings. We hope she sometimes gets to hang out with a guinea pig wearing scale-mail armor as well.

Pulguinha’s fantastic harness was created by Silvia Ferreira’s SkyPirate Creations, Porto, Portugal-based makers of alternative clothing, leather and other crafts.

To see more of Pulguinha and the work of SkyPirate Creations, visit their Facebook page. Many of their Steampunk wares are available for purchase via Rebels Market, Storenvy and Etsy.

[via io9]

Amsterdam-based artist Cedric Laquieze (previously featured here) recently completed a fascinating new series of his exquisite taxidermy Fairies. These delicate sculptures are primarily composed of parts from many different insect species, but if you look closely you’ll notice bones, seeds and even a few scorpion parts as well.

Visit Cedric Laquieze’s blog for many additional images and to check out some of his other enchanting creations.

[via Cedric Laquieze]

These beautiful moths and butterflies look like they’re ready to flutter up and away, but they won’t be doing so because they’re wonderful textile sculptures painstakingly created by North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita. She sews, embroiders and stitches all sorts of multi-colored fabrics to create these oversized insects, which measure nearly a foot wide. She also adds painted details along with feathers and artificial fur. With great care Okita has achieved an awesome balance between astonishing realism and fanciful invention.

Click here to view more of Yumi Okita’s gorgeous textile insect sculptures.

[via Colossal and Demilked]

Joyce Lin is a student at the Rhode Island School of Design and in her spare time she creates awesome interactive kinetic sculptures like the beautiful flying fish and bird study pieces pictured here. Although the design and construction process must’ve been painstaking, they were made using simple materials such as popsicle sticks, mylar and tracing vellum.

Speaking about her work she says, “When people view and activate my sculptures, I would like them to feel a kind of childlike awe and wonderment while being reminded that we are part of an infinite chain of systems within systems.”

Visit Joyce Lin’s Behance page to check out more of her creations.

[via Junkculture]

It’s always an awe-inspiring pleasure to visit the Department of Awesome Macro Photography. Today we discover the work of Linden Gledhill, a biochemist and photographer who takes extraordinary macro photos of moth and butterfly wings.

Using a fully-automated macro focusing rail created by Cognisys, Gledhill creates amazing hi-res images that magnify the surfaces of insect wings 7 to 10 times life-size. His photos reveal the many incredible colors and textures of the individual scales that make up the insects’ remarkable wings. In the second photo we can even see a single grain of pollen on a butterfly’s wing.

Head over to Linden Gledhill’s Flickr stream to view more of his astonishing and beautiful macro photos.

[via Design Taxi]

The days have grown cold and short, Lovecraftian Solstice Carols can be heard on the wind, and in the Portland, OR home of Maika, co-editor of the Geyser of Awesome, the spot on the living room floor where betentacled trees have stood in years past has suddenly begun to darken and roil. Cthulhumas approaches and it’s time to pay tribute.

Dread Cthulhu still waits dreaming, but this year the Cthulhumas tree awoke. Its eyes are a pair of Giant Christmas Tree Googly Eyes that were altered with spray paint, paint pens, and markers. The wings were made using wire hangers, floral wire and tape, green cellophane, and the helpful guidance of a wing-making Instructable created by mercifulmaenad. Small sacrifices of blood, skin, and cherished cloth were made in the process and eldritch incantations were murmured.

Now the tree watches, unblinking. Sometime, just of the corner of an eye, the blue lights flicker and its tentacles appear to writhe. In the middle of the night the soft rustling of cellophane wings has been heard. The tree never sleeps. 

Merry Cthulhumas friends. May the deep dark sleep of the Great Old Ones continue undisturbed.

Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn.

French artist Edouard Martinet (previously featured here) has created a new series of astonishing assemblage animals, which will be on exhibit at Sladmore Contemporary in London from November 27th to January 31, 2014. Edouard thoughtfully uses all sorts of scrap materials to create these marvelous animals and assembles them without soldering or welding the parts together.

Each time we look at one of his incredibly intricate pieces, it’s as though we’re seeing his work for the very first time. Christopher Jobson of Colossal put it perfectly:

"When looking at these perfectly assembled sculptures by French artist Edouard Martinet (previously) it’s difficult to believe the raw materials he used ever existed in another form. Yet every head, thorax, leg, wing, and eye from these assorted creatures was once part of a car, bicycle, typewriter, or other found object. Reading through his material lists it becomes clear how completely thorough and judicious Martinet is in selecting the perfect objects to realize his vision, truly a master of his craft.”

Visit Edouard Martinet’s website to view more of his awesome scrap metal creatures.

[via Colossal]

Kjell Bloch Sandved is a retired Norwegian nature photographer who, over the course of his long career, amassed an amazing collection of images of the patterns found on butterfly and moth wings. The longer he looked at these patterns, the better he became at recognizing familiar shapes and symbols therein. Eventually Sandved was able to use his photographs to compile a complete Butterfly Alphabet.

"Featuring all twenty-six letters in the English alphabet, as well as the ten single-digit numbers (0 through 9), Sandved assembled a wonderfully colorful collection of readable butterfly and moth wings. "

Sandved sells beautiful poster prints of the Butterfly Alphabet. He also takes orders for custom words and phrases created using his photos of letters, numbers, and even a variety of symbols all found on butterfly and moth wings. Click here to learn more.
[via My Modern Metropolis]

Kjell Bloch Sandved is a retired Norwegian nature photographer who, over the course of his long career, amassed an amazing collection of images of the patterns found on butterfly and moth wings. The longer he looked at these patterns, the better he became at recognizing familiar shapes and symbols therein. Eventually Sandved was able to use his photographs to compile a complete Butterfly Alphabet.

"Featuring all twenty-six letters in the English alphabet, as well as the ten single-digit numbers (0 through 9), Sandved assembled a wonderfully colorful collection of readable butterfly and moth wings. "

Sandved sells beautiful poster prints of the Butterfly Alphabet. He also takes orders for custom words and phrases created using his photos of letters, numbers, and even a variety of symbols all found on butterfly and moth wings. Click here to learn more.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

From sports car to mythical monster car, this fantastic vehicle is a BMW Z4 that was extravagantly transformed into a dragon car. We love how the gull-wing doors have been turned into the dragon’s wings.

"Sprayed a gaudy gold, the BMW Z4 has then painstakingly been adorned with the limbs of a dragon, including legs and feet with golden claws, wings on the scissor doors, a tail that sashays behind it and a bonnet that is covered in scales. Each and every scale is made from the bone of China’s indigenous mountain yak, and is designed with a dragon-inspired pattern."

These photos were taken while the spectacular car was on display at the China Import and Export Fair in the southern Guangdong province.

[via Dailymail.co.uk]

We just recently featured a selection of awesome work by artist Oakland-based artist Jeremy Mayer, who disassembles old typewriters and transforms their parts into awesome works of sculptural art. But his latest pieces are so great we couldn’t bear to wait to share them with you.

Just like his previous pieces, these beautiful swallows were created by assembling typewriter parts:

"The pieces required Mayer to find multiple sets of identical parts adding a significant amount of time to sourcing materials, but as a happy accident the artist also discovered his design allowed for the wings to partially retract. If you’re unfamiliar with Mayer’s work it might surprise you to know that he doesn’t use solder or glue (or even objects that haven’t originated from a typewriter), but instead assembles everything using only native parts.”

Follow Jeremy’s future projects via his website or here on Tumblr.

[via Colossal]