These awesome and impressively lifelike paper birds are the work of an amazing Colombian paper artist named Diana Beltran Herrera. Diana is currently working on a collection of eight sculptures that will be exhibited at The Cornell Fine Arts Museum in Winter Park, Florida from September 17th to December 8, 2013.

Visit Diana’s Flickr page to check out many more of her astonishingly detailed and delicate creations.

[via Colossal]

These beautifully painted trees are the work of Wang Yue, a 23-year-old art student in Shijiazhuang, China. Wang Yue specifically seeks out holes in the trunks of trees to use as her canvas - parts of the urban landscape most people overlook. But once they’ve been painted, passersby can’t help but be delighted by the unexpected sight of animals peering out from the trees or magical landscapes that appear to exist inside the trunks, like tiny portals to other worlds. 

"Each piece takes Wang about two hours to complete. The local environmental protection bureau has approved the artworks and publicly stated that the paints used will not harm the tree and will eventually wash away over time. Wang Yue’s artwork has received much praise in the Chinese media. The splash of colour has been welcomed by the citizens of Shijiazhuang, a city of over ten million people, known for having some of the worst air pollution in the world.”

[via Twisted Sifter]

From the Department of Awesome Animal Anatomy comes this post by astronomy-to-zoology about Woodpecker Tongues.

“The woodpecker’s tongue can extend 2/3 its body length. Its tongue is covered in sticky saliva and barbs all over with an ear (a hearing mechanism) at the end of it. So it can listen to its prey. It detects sound. The tongue is so long that it fits its tongue in its head by wrapping around its brain and around its eye sockets. It can move its head/beak up to 15-16 times per second as it strikes a tree. This is incredibly fast. It creates immense forces, 250 more times than astronauts are subjected to. It is 1,000 G’s. The woodpecker has cartilage around the brain that keeps it from shattering.”

That’s one impressive tongue.
Learning is awesome!

From the Department of Awesome Animal Anatomy comes this post by astronomy-to-zoology about Woodpecker Tongues.

“The woodpecker’s tongue can extend 2/3 its body length. Its tongue is covered in sticky saliva and barbs all over with an ear (a hearing mechanism) at the end of it. So it can listen to its prey. It detects sound. The tongue is so long that it fits its tongue in its head by wrapping around its brain and around its eye sockets. It can move its head/beak up to 15-16 times per second as it strikes a tree. This is incredibly fast. It creates immense forces, 250 more times than astronauts are subjected to. It is 1,000 G’s. The woodpecker has cartilage around the brain that keeps it from shattering.”

That’s one impressive tongue.

Learning is awesome!

Reblogged from astronomy-to-zoology