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983 posts tagged design

This awesome Salacious B. Crumb purse was created by Astoria, New York-based artist Cat Penfold, who used her painting skills to give the leather purse a geektastic makeover. This excellent likeness of Jabba the Hutt’s naughty Kowakian monkey-lizard comes without the little jester’s shrill cackle. In fact, every time he opens his mouth, it’s only so that you can shove something into or pull something out of it, which sounds really cathartic.

This Salacious Crumb Purse is currently available here via Cat Penfold’s Knit One, Pearl Two Etsy shop.

[via Technabob]

Louisville, Kentucky-based artist Tom Pfannerstill creates amazing works of art that look like trash, and not just any trash, but actual pieces of litter that he actually found and picked up. For an ongoing series entitled From the Street, Pfannerstill uses the trompe l’oeil technique to paint flat pieces of wood so that they become uncanny likenesses of discarded objects and disposable containers, everything from a smashed boxes of Animal Crackers and Cracker Jack to a beat-up old baseball cap.

"…he starts off by choosing a real piece of trash and traces the outline of the object onto a flat piece of wood. Once his wooden canvas is ready, he fills it in with acrylic paints, in painstaking detail. The two-dimensional painting soon comes to life, looking exactly like a piece of trash it was modeled after."

So why paint depictions of trash? We’re glad you asked. Pfannerstill views each object he finds as something mass-produced that’s become utterly unique as it has been altered by time and exposure to the elements. No two pieces of litter are the same.

“The sparkling clean surfaces are smudged and marked by everyday dirt, grit and grime. No two objects have exactly the same journey.”

Pfannerstill also regards these piece of urban detritus as future artifacts:

“As time inevitably marches on and everything, trash included continues to change, my little pieces ‘from the street’ will become increasingly ‘of a time’. As the popularity of products ebb and flow and certain products disappear altogether as wants, needs and lifestyles change, the will become increasingly esoteric.”

Visit Tom Pfannerstill’s website to check out more of his artwork, including more pieces from his From the Street series.

[via Oddity Central]

Colossal, the Department of Incredible Insects recently encountered more photos of the fascinating work of French artist Hubert Duprat and his industrious Caddisflies (previously featured here).

"Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away."

Since the 1980s Duprat has been collecting caddisfly larvae from their normal environments and transporting them to aquariums in his studio. There he gently removes their own natural cocoons and puts the larvae in tanks filled with materials such as pearls, beads, opals, turquoise and pieces of 18-karat gold. The insects still do exactly what comes naturally to them, but in doing so they create exquisite gilded sculptures that they temporarily call home. If you saw them out of context, you’d never guess they’d been created insects.

Visit Colossal for additional images and video of Hubert Duprat discussing these amazing insects and their shiny, shiny creations.

New York City-based artist Zoë Williams creates awesomely strange felted wool sculptures of spectral creatures that look like species you’d encounter if you were magically dropped into one of Hayao Miyazaki's films such as Spirited Away or Princess Mononoke. Most of Williams’ sculptures are created using white wool, which heightens their otherworldly feel. She speaks to this on her website with an apposite quotation from Melleville’s Moby Dick:

"Symbolize whatever grand or gracious thing he will by whiteness, no man can deny that in its profoundest idealized significance it calls up a peculiar apparition to the soul."

Williams has been creating her singular sculptures for over seven years now, so the pieces pictured here barely scratch the surface of her unearthly oeuvre. Be sure to visit Zoë Williams’ website, Flickr page or Instagram account to check out more of her fantastic felt creatures. Although most of her work is shown in gallery exhibitions, she also has an Etsy shop where she sometimes makes her pieces available for purchase.

[via Laughing Squid]

Less talk, more awesome monkey selfies!

A few years ago we featured an unforgettable photo of a Black-crested macaque in in North Sulawesi, Indonesia who snapped her very own beaming self-portrait using photographer David Slater’s camera.

Shapeways member Pete Rossdale just created this fantastic 3D-printed sandstone sculpture based on the famous monkey selfie. Available here.

[via Super Punch]

Million Dollar Idea Napkin Sketchbook - The best ideas are written on cocktail napkins at the end of an evening, so why not write all your ideas on napkins? This Million Dollar Idea Napkin Sketchbook will increase the chances of your big idea turning profits and, as an added bonus, your business plan will be absorbent. Each 5-1/8” x 4-3/4” sketchbook is filled with thirty blank napkins (120 pages) for you to jot down product ideas or invent the next big social media network (or both).

Buy one here

Source mcphee.com

After you’ve awarded your cat with the World’s Best Cat Trophy, treat yourself (or your neighborhood Crazy Cat Lady) to a pair of earrings custom-made to look like your favorite feline. Let your kitty dangle from your the ears to show the world just how awesome they are.

These pieces of fabulous feline finery are the work of Leo the Cat Gallery, an online Japanese shop that uses photos of your pet to custom-craft earrings in their likeness. Leo the Cat’s earrings are available in four styles: Head Only, Full Body, I Spotted My Kitty, which depicts your cat peeking out from behind your earlobes, and the top-of-the-line option, My Kitty’s Hanging On, which features your cat dangling from your ears. Hang in there kitty!

"After sending in your cat’s photo, Leo will draw up three different designs, based on your requests such as colors you prefer or additional accouterments you’d like. For customers with gold allergies, earrings made with plastic resin parts are also available."

Leo the Cat Gallery is currently working through a backlog of orders, so they’re aren’t accepting new orders until September at the earliest. In the meantime you can follow them on Instagram to see many more photos of their fine feline fashion accessories.

[via RocketNews24]

The leaf pictured at the top of this post isn’t a leaf at all. It’s made of paper and is an exquisite example of the Japanese art of papercutting is called Kirie (切り絵, meaning ‘cut paper’). All of the extraordinarily delicate examples of the Kirie seen here were handmade by a self-taught Japanese artist named Akira Nagaya, whose skills were first discovered about 30 years ago while he was working in a sushi shop.

"One of his first tasks was to learn sasabaran, a technique to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Back at home, and recalling his boss’s demonstration, Nagaya tried to practice using paper and a utility knife. He found that the technique came quite naturally, and he enjoyed doing it.”

Years later Nagaya was still making his intricate paper objects when he opened his very own restaurant and decided to display his kirie “for fun.” When a local newspaper showed up to review his restaurant they spotted his creations and encouraged him to display them in a gallery.

“That was the first time I even considered what I had been doing as art,” recalls Nagaya.

Head over to Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to check out many more of his marvelous cut paper creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago]