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1004 posts tagged design

Whether you’re waiting in line for the new iPhone or hiding in the woods waiting to capture proof of the existence of Bigfoot, it’s crucial that you’re able to get some rest no matter where you are. Thank goodness for this awesome Wearable Futon Air Mat Set by Japanese office supply manufacturer King Jim:

The coat-like wearable futon can be fastened at the neck and the bottoms of the legs folded up to adjust for different heights or to make it snugger in colder seasons. The pack includes an air mat so you have a full blanket and futon set that is comfortable and quick to prepare (there’s even an air pump included to help). The wearable futon can be rolled up into a sack like a sleeping bag while the air bed-like mat flattens, making this super easy to store in the A4 file-sized pack.

Now there’s no need to pack a cumbersome bag with blankets and a pillow or suffer trying to sleep on the cold, hard ground. Not when you could be wearing a stylish pair of futon coveralls and then, when it’s sleepy time, inflate your personal air mattress and drift off to a peaceful sleep, quietly hoping that none of the poor suckers who don’t have their own wearable futons decide spend their sleepless hours trying to figure out if you and your air mattress will float or perhaps make a good toboggan.

Click here to order.

[via Japan Trend Shop]

Awesome Anamorphic Artwork isn’t restricted to walls, floors and sketchbooks. There’s a whole amazing subset that, instead of having the viewer stand in just the right spot, requires looking at flat image or sculpture reflected in a cylindrical mirror in order to see it properly.

Last month the folks at Bored Panda assembled a fascinating collection of 23 examples of this mind-bending art form. Here you see pieces by István Orosz, Jonty Hurwitz, Vera Bugatti and Awtar Singh Virdi respectively.

Click here to view the entire post.

[via Bored Panda]

Redditor fungiside was in the right place at the right time to capture this awesome image of a giant digital billboard during a video calibration test. We’re pretty sure this is a lot more fun to look at than whatever advertisement was subsequently displayed.

"The video is a test to make sure all of the individual panels are working together to make one complete picture. And actually, if you look about a quarter of the way up from the bottom, you will notice a horizontal line going all the way across and breaking the pattern. This is what they are looking for when doing a test like this."

Click here to watch a brief video of the psychedelic calibration process.
[via Twisted Sifter]

Redditor fungiside was in the right place at the right time to capture this awesome image of a giant digital billboard during a video calibration test. We’re pretty sure this is a lot more fun to look at than whatever advertisement was subsequently displayed.

"The video is a test to make sure all of the individual panels are working together to make one complete picture. And actually, if you look about a quarter of the way up from the bottom, you will notice a horizontal line going all the way across and breaking the pattern. This is what they are looking for when doing a test like this."

Click here to watch a brief video of the psychedelic calibration process.

[via Twisted Sifter]

In 1888 actress Ellen Terry performed the role of Lady Macbeth at London’s Lyceum Theatre while wearing an awesome green gown bedecked with the 1,000 sloughed-off wings of the jewel beetle. It quickly became one of the most celebrated costumes of the Victorian era, immortalized in a portrait painted by John Singer Sargent.

126 years is a long time and over the years Dame Terry’s dress experienced all sorts of wear and tear and numerous alterations. But after 1,300 hours of painstaking work over and £50,000 ($81,000) in expenses, this magnificent costume has been restored to its original glory.

Work began on the gown two years ago after a successful fundraising campaign, but restoring the beetle wings wasn’t the most difficult task. “We had collected the beetle wings that had fallen off over the years,” says Paul Meredith, house manager at Smallhythe Place, where the dress now resides, “so that the conservator was able to reattach many of the originals, plus others that had been donated to us—1,000 in total.” The restoration team patched the 100 or so broken wings using small pieces of Japanese tissue and wheat starch paste.

Click here to read more about the restoration process.

Photos by Zenzie Tinker

[via Morbid Anatomy and Ecouterre]

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.

Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.

[via Bored Panda]

Letters are full of awesome potential. Combine enough of them and you’ve got a declaration of love, a sidesplitting joke, a life-saving message in a bottle, a precious secret, a poem, a novel or a Broadway play. Swiss visual artist and graphic designer Cyril Voilloz manipulates letters in a much different fashion. He treats them as visual playthings that can be poked to squirt ink, peeled from their paper, pulled and twisted from a sketchbook onto a computer screen or opened to reveal their internal components. It’s typography that teases 2D letters into 3D objects and we love it.

Visit Cyril Voilloz’s website or follow him on Instagram to check out lots more of his awesome artwork.

[via Visual News]

Put the needle on the record, play the record, then eat the record! German inventor Peter Lardong creates perfectly playable and completely delicious chocolate records in his home in Berlin. He experimented with making records using ice cream, beer, cola, sausages, cheese and butter before hitting upon his special chocolate mixture of cocoa, cocoa butter and lecithin. Lardong makes his mouthwatering records by pouring and smoothing melted chocolate onto silicone molds of his favorite records. After the chocolate sets and cools in the firdge, the record is removed from the mold, ready to be played and eaten.

Each of Lardong’s edible chocolate records costs approximately $6 and can be successfully played on a standard record player up to 12 times. That is, assuming you can hold out that long before giving into the temptation to chomp on a chocolate record. Some records are meant to be broken, these records are made to be played and then eaten.

[via Visual News]

Behold the bright red awesomeness that is the World’s Longest Sofa! With an official length of 1,006.61 meters (3,302 feet and 6 inches), this colossal couch boasts a 2,500 person seating capacity. Located in Saratov, Russia, it was created by Russian furniture company Mnogo Mebeli to celebrate their fifth anniversary on July 25, 2014. Just imagine the pillow fort you could make with all of those couch cushions!

Click here for timelapse video of the assembly of this extraordinary sofa.

[via Lost At E Minor and Odd Stuff Magazine]

The first Sunday in September just came and went, which means the Zundert Flower Parade or Corso Zundert (previously featured here) has just taken place. Once again the streets of the small town of Zundert (birthplace of Vincent van Gogh), located in the south of the Netherlands right at the Belgian border, played host to the annual parade of awesomely large, elaborate and colorful floats made of dahlias.

This year 20 enormous floats were created by various districts within the city. In effort to encourage creativity, the Zundert Flower Parade never has a theme for its float makers. Each team is free to design whatever they like provided that their float is completely covered in beautiful dahlia flowers and fits within the 20 x 10 meter (65 x 33 foot) size limit.

This year the parade saw everything from a deconstructed 737 airliner to a guitar-playing cephalopod, with the first place prize awarded to the brawny flexing horse float, Horsepower.

Click here video footage of the parade and here for additional photos by Omroep Brabant.

[via Colossal and Neatorama]

It’s been over a year since we last checked in on the beautiful work of Russian paper artist and graphic designer Yulia Brodskaya (previously featured here), who creates vibrant, lyrical illustrations using quilling or paper filigree as well as other sculptural techniques. Brodskaya has been experimenting with paper quilling for over six years and now, in addition to progressing with her personal artwork, creates high-profile commissions for people and companies such as fashion designer Issey Miyake, Godiva chocolates, an Paramount films.

Visit Yulia Brodskaya’s website to check out more of her work, both professional and personal. She’s also featured in the wonderful new book Paper Cut: An Exploration Into the Contemporary World of Papercraft Art and Illustration compiled by paper artist Owen Gildersleeve [Buy on Amazon].

[via Colossal]