Tag Results

968 posts tagged design

Check out these awesomely cute and sleepy pieces of topiary in the Jardin des Plantes de Nantes, a botanical garden located in Nantes, France. Created by French artist and children’s book author Claude Ponti, they’re part of the “Journey to Nantes" (Le Voyage à Nantes) art festival. These delightful topiary sculptures are just one stop on the festival’s 10-mile-long trail of public artwork on display throughout Nantes.

Photos by Molaire & Tentacules, Les petits nantais, Jean-Sebastian Evrard and Big City Life Nantes respectively. (The sleepy bird in the bottom image is from the 2013 festival.)

[via Neatorama]

Today the Department of Beguiling Book Art explores the exquisite work of New York-based artist Brian Dettmer, a self-described Book Surgeon, who uses knives, tweezers and surgical tools to transform old books into amazing, multi-layered sculptures. Taking one page at a time, Dettmer painstakingly carves out illustrations and text from old medical journals, dictionaries, atlases, encyclopedias and other beautifully illustrated books. Nothing is ever added or rearranged, only removed. The pages and spines of the books are manipulated to further shape the book sculptures. He also combines multiple books, folding, bending, rolling and stacking them to create larger and even more complex sculptural forms.

Dettmer views his artwork as an intensive collaboration with the existing material:

“Images and ideas are revealed to expose alternate histories and memories, ” explains Dettmer in the artist’s statement. “My work is a collaboration with the existing material and its past creators and the completed pieces expose new relationships of the book’s internal elements exactly where they have been since their original conception.”

Visit Brian Dettmer’s website to check out more of his astonishing book book sculptures.

[via Beautiful/Decay and Demilked]

Finger Hands - Hey dude, did you ever wonder what it would look like if your fingers had tiny hands on the end as if they were arms? It’s a freak out! This set of five irresistible soft vinyl finger puppets fit snugly on the end of your fingers and look like a quintet of tiny right hands. Now you can give a high twenty-five.

Buy them here

Source mcphee.com

Canadian artist Maskull Lasserre (previously featured here) has recently been “re-carving” mass-produced wooden souvenir sculptures and decoys to reveal intricate an skeletal system beneath each sculpture’s wooden skin.

These fascinating reworked wooden sculptures remind us of the dissected sculptures created by New York-based artist Jason Freeny (previously featured here).

Visit Maskull Lasserre’s online portfolio to check out more of his amazing artwork.

[via Colossal]

This exquisitely, scrumptiously detailed Library Cake was made by Kathy Knaus. One side features the entrance to the brick library building, flanked by potted plants. The other side reveals the library’s cozy interior, complete with countless books lining its double-decker shelves, a large globe, and a wonderfully cluttered reading table accented with gum drop lamps.
Libraries are awesome places and cake is one of the best things ever, so this sweet, edible library is extra-mega-super-duper awesome.
[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

This exquisitely, scrumptiously detailed Library Cake was made by Kathy Knaus. One side features the entrance to the brick library building, flanked by potted plants. The other side reveals the library’s cozy interior, complete with countless books lining its double-decker shelves, a large globe, and a wonderfully cluttered reading table accented with gum drop lamps.

Libraries are awesome places and cake is one of the best things ever, so this sweet, edible library is extra-mega-super-duper awesome.

[via That’s Nerdalicious!]

19-year-old Queen’s University engineering student David Chesney spent four years building a wooden roller coaster in his parents’ backyard in Toronto, CA. He calls it the Minotaur and it was built using used scrap wood, steel plating and his uncle’s tools. The homemade coaster measures 12 ft tall and 92 ft long and features two ~12 ft drops. Chesney says the coaster’s steel car can reach speeds of 20 km/h.

“My dad didn’t like the idea at all from the beginning,” Chesney explained to the Toronto Star. “Mom was kinda, ‘Uhhhh, I guess so.’ I don’t think that either of them understood the scope of what I had in mind.”

“It just got bigger,” he added. “Then it got to the point where my parents said ‘it’s huge but you’ve gotten this far so just finish it and then take it down after.’ ”

Click here for video of the Minotaur in action and visit David Chesney’s Minotaur Facebook Page lots of process photos.

[via The Independent]

Here’s some electrifyingly awesome fashion design that would’ve made Nikola Tesla proud. Dutch designer Anouk Wipprecht created (and modeled) this stunning Faraday Cage Dress, a metal garment capable of conducting nearly one million volts of electricity. The dress is made of metal plates, 600 rings of chain mail, plasma ball epaulets and a helmet covered in metal spikes with a protective face grill.

To construct and successfully model the dress Wipprecht collaborated with ArcAttack, an Austin, TX-based performance art group who use Tesla coils and Faraday suits as part of their act. Wipprecht modeled her Faraday Cage Dress in a dazzling performance at the 2014 Bay Area Maker Faire in May:

"Standing stalwartly between a pair of Tesla coils, electricity arcing around her to the strains of In the Hall of the Mountain King by ArcAttack, Wipprecht remained safe in the confines of her homemade Faraday cage, which distributed the electrical charge around its exterior while shielding the contents within.”

Click here for video footage of the performance, including Anouk Wipprecht’s perspective from inside the suit.

If you’re interested in knowing more about how this phenomenal garment was made, Wipprecht wrote all about it in a detailed Instructables post entitled “How to Get Fashionably Struck by Lightning.” However she cautions amateurs against trying to reproduce the dress one their own:

"If the arcs raise through your heart, you might not live to tell, so if anything, this process was done very carefully," she said. "ArcAttack have been doing this for over 12 years and are specialists in their field."

Head over to Instructables to learn more about this astounding project.

[via Inhabitat and ecouterre]