Tag Results

171 posts tagged gif

Today the Department of Awesome Natural Phenomena shares a rare and incredible sight: a pod of sperm whales fast asleep, floating in a vertical position, some with noses pointed up towards the water’s surface, some pointed down to the ocean floor. It’s a haunting sight, something the whales are believed to do for only brief periods of about 12 minutes at a time. Quick, vertical power naps.

Researchers have observed sleeping sperm whales exhibiting the same sort of Rapid Eye Movement that’s associated with dreaming in humans. So now we’re wondering what sorts of awesome things whales dream about.

Above gif and image taken from video footage used in the Discovery Channel series The Magic of the Big Blue (episode 4 of 7). Click here to watch.

[via Twisted Sifter and Sploid]

This awesome Interactive Origami Sculpture was created by Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima, who’d been challenged to create something inspired by the fascinating Ghostcube system made by Swedish designer Erik Åberg. Nothing but paper and glue make up this interlocking system of 40 paper cubes.

If you’re feeling dexterous, Nakashima created a 45-step Instructables tutorial to help you make your very own kinetic origami sculpture.

He also runs an extraordinarily popular YouTube channel devoted to instructional origami videos, which is well worth a visit.

[via Colossal]

Cue the theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey. We’ve see all sorts of awesome photos and video footage shot by astronauts aboard the ISS, so now lets take an extraordinary peek at the space station itself. The European Space Agency's Optical Ground Station (OGS) at the Teide Observatory in Tenerife, Spain just captured a brief, but awe-inspiring video of the ISS floating in space.

This extraordinary video clip was recorded at ESA’s Optical Ground Station (OGS) at about 19:05 UTC on 8 October 2014 as the station illuminated the ISS with a 3.6-Watt 532-nm green laser, used for testing next-gen optical communication technologies. The video clearly shows the ISS bathed in green light as it is tracked by the OGS through the 4-minute pass at an altitude of about 420 km.

Click here to watch the video clip (and don’t forget to add the soundtrack).
[via Sploid]

Cue the theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey. We’ve see all sorts of awesome photos and video footage shot by astronauts aboard the ISS, so now lets take an extraordinary peek at the space station itself. The European Space Agency's Optical Ground Station (OGS) at the Teide Observatory in Tenerife, Spain just captured a brief, but awe-inspiring video of the ISS floating in space.

This extraordinary video clip was recorded at ESA’s Optical Ground Station (OGS) at about 19:05 UTC on 8 October 2014 as the station illuminated the ISS with a 3.6-Watt 532-nm green laser, used for testing next-gen optical communication technologies. The video clearly shows the ISS bathed in green light as it is tracked by the OGS through the 4-minute pass at an altitude of about 420 km.

Click here to watch the video clip (and don’t forget to add the soundtrack).

[via Sploid]

Science + Art = Super Awesome, which is why we can’t take our eyes off these fascinatingly beautiful gifs of accelerated 4K Ultra HD footage of chemical reactions. They’re the result of a wonderful new project entitled Beautiful Chemistry, a collaborative effort by Tsinghua University Press and the University of Science and Technology of China created in effort to make chemistry more interesting and accessible for the general public.

The first stage of this ongoing project was the filming of 8 different chemical reactions in extraordinary detail using a 4K Ultra HD camera without the visual distraction of science equipment such as beakers and test tubes. Watching the stunning results the team has achieved feels like watching alien worlds being born.

Click here to watch the Beautiful Chemical Reactions video, filmed and edited by Yan Liang.

To make your day even more sciencetastic, explore the Beautiful Chemistry project page and head over to io9 for more gifs created using the video footage.

[via Colossal and io9]

The mouthwatering sound of sizzling bacon is something we enjoy almost as much as eating the bacon itself. Here UK-based illustrator James Chapman teaches us the delectable sounds of sizzling as they’re spoken in five different languages.

Thank God it’s Fry-day.
twitter | facebook | instagram | shop

Follow James Chapman here on Tumblr at chapmangamo to learn many more forms of onomatopoeia in other languages.

The mouthwatering sound of sizzling bacon is something we enjoy almost as much as eating the bacon itself. Here UK-based illustrator James Chapman teaches us the delectable sounds of sizzling as they’re spoken in five different languages.

Thank God it’s Fry-day.

twitter | facebook | instagram | shop

Follow James Chapman here on Tumblr at chapmangamo to learn many more forms of onomatopoeia in other languages.

Reblogged from chapmangamo

"To chap, or not to chap - that is the question…"

A question you can answer with our Shakespearean Lip Balm Set! You get Hamlet (with bonus piece of Yorick), Shakespeare and Macbeth (or as we call it: the Scottish balm). They are ready to make your mouth as moist as Desdemona’s hand in Act 3, Scene 4 of Othello.

Buy a set here

Source mcphee.com

Colossal, the Department of Incredible Insects recently encountered more photos of the fascinating work of French artist Hubert Duprat and his industrious Caddisflies (previously featured here).

"Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away."

Since the 1980s Duprat has been collecting caddisfly larvae from their normal environments and transporting them to aquariums in his studio. There he gently removes their own natural cocoons and puts the larvae in tanks filled with materials such as pearls, beads, opals, turquoise and pieces of 18-karat gold. The insects still do exactly what comes naturally to them, but in doing so they create exquisite gilded sculptures that they temporarily call home. If you saw them out of context, you’d never guess they’d been created insects.

Visit Colossal for additional images and video of Hubert Duprat discussing these amazing insects and their shiny, shiny creations.

Bigfoot Ornament - In search of the perfect Christmas Ornament? If there’s one thing Bigfoot knows, it’s how to use pine trees as camouflage. So, we recommend you hide this ornament on your Christmas tree and then have a contest to see who can find him first. He can also stand on his own if you’re not into that whole “hanging” thing, man.
Buy one here

Bigfoot Ornament - In search of the perfect Christmas Ornament? If there’s one thing Bigfoot knows, it’s how to use pine trees as camouflage. So, we recommend you hide this ornament on your Christmas tree and then have a contest to see who can find him first. He can also stand on his own if you’re not into that whole “hanging” thing, man.

Buy one here

Source mcphee.com

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.

[via Colossal and iGNANT]