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208 posts tagged japan

Whether you’re waiting in line for the new iPhone or hiding in the woods waiting to capture proof of the existence of Bigfoot, it’s crucial that you’re able to get some rest no matter where you are. Thank goodness for this awesome Wearable Futon Air Mat Set by Japanese office supply manufacturer King Jim:

The coat-like wearable futon can be fastened at the neck and the bottoms of the legs folded up to adjust for different heights or to make it snugger in colder seasons. The pack includes an air mat so you have a full blanket and futon set that is comfortable and quick to prepare (there’s even an air pump included to help). The wearable futon can be rolled up into a sack like a sleeping bag while the air bed-like mat flattens, making this super easy to store in the A4 file-sized pack.

Now there’s no need to pack a cumbersome bag with blankets and a pillow or suffer trying to sleep on the cold, hard ground. Not when you could be wearing a stylish pair of futon coveralls and then, when it’s sleepy time, inflate your personal air mattress and drift off to a peaceful sleep, quietly hoping that none of the poor suckers who don’t have their own wearable futons decide spend their sleepless hours trying to figure out if you and your air mattress will float or perhaps make a good toboggan.

Click here to order.

[via Japan Trend Shop]

Today the Department of Impossible Cuteness invites you to play another round of “Eat it or keep it as a pet?” RocketNews24 assembled an overwhelmingly kawaii collection of hard-boiled eggs that’ve been altered and decorated to turn them into all sorts of cute bento creatures, from chickens, bunnies, cows and pandas to Pikachu and a wee baby seal.

Could you conquer the debilitating cuteness of these enhanced eggs in order to enjoy them as lunch?

Head over to RocketNews24 for additional images and photo credits.

It’s never too early to start planning what to offer your neighborhood trick-or-treaters. These remarkably/horrifyingly lifelike gummy grubs and caterpillars would make awesome Halloween treats. Although they may look like they just wriggled out of your nightmares, they’re actually handmade, fruit-filled sweets. They’re made in Japan at Akai Tento no Koohii Ten (The Red Tent Coffee Shop), a small coffee stand located on the east coast of Aomori Prefecture.

We can’t stop staring at these photos, because we’re convinced one of the grubs is about to twitch. Akai Tento is a small business, but these amazingly unsettling creepy-crawly gummy candies have earned the shop nationwide (and now international) attention.

Each of Akai Tento’s gruesome gummies is available to buy individually or in packs (or perhaps that should be clutches?) via Yahoo! Japan Shopping, and cost between 300 and 350 yen (US$2.80-3.20) each.

Photos via Akai Tento and Yahoo! Shopping

[via RocketNews24]

Last week we featured a selection of exquisite works of cut paper art by a Japanese Kirie artist named Akira Nagaya. Today we learned that Nagaya also creates awesome cut-out depictions of beloved Anime, manga, cartoon and comic book characters using individual Post-it notes.

Visit Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to view more of his playful pop culture Post-it cut-outs.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

Japanese textile artist betibettin crocheted this awesome bowl of ramen that looks good enough to eat, although we’d recommend using it as a pillow for a post-ramen nap rather than an actual meal. Each ingredient has been expertly crocheted, right down to the tiny curls of green onion.

betibettin created a fascinating video tutorial for this project so we can see just how each ingredient was made. We were particularly curious about how he made the noodles and broth look so realistic.

You can check out more of betibettin’s crocheted creations via his YouTube channel or right here on Tumblr at betibettin.

No please excuse us while we go heat up some Cup Noodle.

[via RocketNews24]

Check out the awesomely long tails on these roosters! These regal specimens are Onagadori or “Long-tailed” chickens. They’re a breed of chicken from the Kōchi Prefecture of Japan who evolved from common domestic chickens who mated with Green Junglefowl. Also known as the ‘most honorable fowl’ in Japan, they’ve been carefully bred over the centuries to achieve their spectacular tails, which grow to lengths of 12 to 27 feet. It takes these chickens at least three years to molt. Onagadori breeders take tremendous pride in their chickens and provide special hutches with perches well above the ground, which helps keep their tails clean and in good condition.

If Rapunzel had been a chicken, she probably would’ve looked a lot like one of these awesome birds. These extraordinarily fancy fowl have Special Natural Monument status in Japan, which means they’re considered to be living monuments of Japanese culture and, as a protected breed, it’s illegal to take their eggs out of the country.

[via Lost At E Minor and Wikipedia]

Remember those outrageously cute Banana Bird capsule toys we posted about a couple week ago? Meet their kawaii canine counterparts: Bread Dogs. Bandai created this adorable new series of Gashapon toys, which is actually their fifth series of Doggy Bread figures to date. (Click here to view them all)

This new Anicolla series features six different, but equally darling dogs who’ve found themselves wearing six different sorts of bread. There’s the Anpug (a pug inside a sweet bean bun), the Pomcutlet Sandwich (a pomeranian who’s taken the place of a katsu pork cutlet), a toy poodle pancake, corgi hot dog, shih tzu sandwich and, last but not least, the Chihuassant (an amazing Chihuahua-croissant hybrid). Despite being less than two inches long, each figure is impressively detailed and, yes, ridiculously cute.

Don’t worry if you haven’t got any capsule toy machines nearby. Right now you can find these little cuties on Ebay.

[via RocketNews24]

In Japan you can enjoy your favorite anime, cartoon and video game characters as more than simply visual entertainment. They’re also available as sweet treats. These kawaii confections are a form of wagashi (和菓子) called nerikiri (練り切り). Made from white bean paste and rice-based dough, nerikiri are often tinted and molded similar to how marzipan is prepared in Western desserts.

These pop culture-inspired nerikiri were all made by Japanese Twitter user Otakumi at a wagashi shop called Kuramoto Hinode, which is located in the Tokushima Prefecture of Japan’s Shikoku island.

Follow Otakumi’s Twitter feed

You can also try your hand at making your very own nerikiri. Click here for the recipe.

[via Kotaku]

After you’ve awarded your cat with the World’s Best Cat Trophy, treat yourself (or your neighborhood Crazy Cat Lady) to a pair of earrings custom-made to look like your favorite feline. Let your kitty dangle from your the ears to show the world just how awesome they are.

These pieces of fabulous feline finery are the work of Leo the Cat Gallery, an online Japanese shop that uses photos of your pet to custom-craft earrings in their likeness. Leo the Cat’s earrings are available in four styles: Head Only, Full Body, I Spotted My Kitty, which depicts your cat peeking out from behind your earlobes, and the top-of-the-line option, My Kitty’s Hanging On, which features your cat dangling from your ears. Hang in there kitty!

"After sending in your cat’s photo, Leo will draw up three different designs, based on your requests such as colors you prefer or additional accouterments you’d like. For customers with gold allergies, earrings made with plastic resin parts are also available."

Leo the Cat Gallery is currently working through a backlog of orders, so they’re aren’t accepting new orders until September at the earliest. In the meantime you can follow them on Instagram to see many more photos of their fine feline fashion accessories.

[via RocketNews24]

The leaf pictured at the top of this post isn’t a leaf at all. It’s made of paper and is an exquisite example of the Japanese art of papercutting is called Kirie (切り絵, meaning ‘cut paper’). All of the extraordinarily delicate examples of the Kirie seen here were handmade by a self-taught Japanese artist named Akira Nagaya, whose skills were first discovered about 30 years ago while he was working in a sushi shop.

"One of his first tasks was to learn sasabaran, a technique to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Back at home, and recalling his boss’s demonstration, Nagaya tried to practice using paper and a utility knife. He found that the technique came quite naturally, and he enjoyed doing it.”

Years later Nagaya was still making his intricate paper objects when he opened his very own restaurant and decided to display his kirie “for fun.” When a local newspaper showed up to review his restaurant they spotted his creations and encouraged him to display them in a gallery.

“That was the first time I even considered what I had been doing as art,” recalls Nagaya.

Head over to Akira Nagaya’s Facebook page to check out many more of his marvelous cut paper creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago]