The Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders would like to welcome these incredibly tiny, ridiculously cute Caribbean pygmy octopus (Octopus mercatoris) hatchlings, born last month at the Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium in Sarasota, Florida.

Can you believe how small they are? Look at all those wee-bitty suckers on their eensy-weensy tentacles. When they’re full grown, these tentacular cuties will only be about the size of a silver dollar. The cuteness, it hurts!

Photos by the Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

[via ZooBorns]

Nothing says “Our love will last forever.” like a tiny gold squid encircling your ring finger. This tentacular little beauty was handmade by Portland, OR-based jeweler Cheyenne Weil of gin & butterflies. She custom-makes each Squid Wedding Band by hand-carving the ring in wax and then casting it using the lost-wax method.

"This ring is a highly detailed piece with the squid and water/wave design flowing all the way around the ring, leaving no particular part "up." It is a nice 8mm in width, over 2mm thick, and has a delicious weighty feel."

Click here for more information and then check out the rest of Cheyenne’s gin & butterflies shop.

[via Fashionably Geek]

If you try reading by the light of this incredibly awesome Cthulhu lamp, don’t be surprised if the letters start to swim on the page and you hear eldritch whispers in your ear. It was created as a tribute to our favorite tentacular embodiment of ancient evil by Montreal-based artist Karl Dupéré-Richer using “the back of one PVC patio chair, 14 chair feet, one flowerpot, one umbrella base, two bike tires, 30 cans, many pieces of PVC pipes, one acrylic globe lights, some car body parts, a few pieces of garden hoses and about 1,000 devoured human souls.”

The Cthulhu light sculpture is currently on display at the EtOH Brasserie in Montreal, Canada.

Click here to check out more Karl Dupéré-Richer’s upcycled artwork.

Visit Neatorama for more photos.

This year marks the 81st Fete du Citron à Menton, the annual Lemon Festival in Menton, France (previously featured here). The theme for this year’s festival is “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”. Over 300 artists worked with 145 tons of citrus fruit to create a variety of awesome sculptures inspired by Jules Verne’s classic 19th century science fiction novel about the adventures of Captain Nemo. We’re particularly fond of the giant octopus and squid, but the Nautilus, whale and Nemo himself are pretty great too.

Photos by Lionel Cironneau, Sebastien Nogier, and Olivier Anrigo respectively.

[via NY Daily News]

Yuko Higuchi’s artwork combines so many of our favourite things, such as tentacles, cats and anthropomorphism, that looking at her drawings feels like we’ve fallen down a rabbit hole created just for us. We were delighted to learn that the adorable kitty featured in so many Yuko’s pieces is based on her own pet cat named Boris. He’s her primary source of inspiration.

These pieces are just a small sampling of Yuko Higuchi's surreal world. You can see lots more of her artwork on Facebook, via Twitter, or right here on Tumblr. She also recently published her very first illustrated book.

[via Spoon & Tamago]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.
This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
[via Retronaut]

This gorgeous, tentacular object is an American chatelaine dating back to 1887. A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it. They were worn by many housekeepers during the 19th century, with each tentacle chain fastened to a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.

This stunning sterling silver octopus chatelaine was made by the Gorham Manufacturing Company and is part of the jewelry collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

[via Retronaut]

Why settle for simply painting your walls when you could be covering them with fantastic wallpaper pattens like these? These designs were all created by Megan Rose Gedris, also known as Rosalarian, and are currently available via Spoonflower.

If you’re like us and already have tentacles on your fingers, face and arms and put up a betentacled Cthulhumas tree each December, odds are your walls are already pulsating with ancient evil. So papering them with Rosalarian’s awesome I Love Craft (get it?) Cthulhu damask wallpaper seems like an appropriately unnatural next step.

Of course, if the ravenous undead are more your style, she’s also got striking Brain and Zombie Brain designs. There’s a gorgeous Mermaid damask pattern as well. The best part is, because these patterns are up on Spoonflower, they’re also available as fabric and gift wrap.

Click here to view all of Rosalarian’s designs.

[via io9]

3D modeler Sean Charlesworth designed, printed and built this tentacular Octopod Underwater Salvage Vehicle as his thesis project for a Masters of Science in Digital Imaging and Design at NYU. Inspired by the Nautilus from Disney’s 1954 film 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Sean’s awesome mechanical octopus-shaped vehicle is beautifully detailed. It features LED lights and an assortment of other working features such as a functional door, hoist, latches, and opening floor panel.

"…the model was designed in CINEMA 4D Studio and different materials, types and colours were assigned to each part. The digital models were printed at the New York University Advance Media Studio on an Objet Connex500 3D Printer. The Objet Connex500 is Objet’s pioneering multi-material 3D printer featuring a large build tray size of 500 x 400 x 200mm and can print from a range of 107 different materials, with up to 14 different materials in a single part."

Click here to learn more about the amazing Octopod and then visit Sean Charlesworth’s website to check out more of his 3D design and modeling work.

[via io9]

For an incredibly kawaii series entitled Invertebrate Sleep Habits, Japanese artist Hiné Mizushima (previously featured here) created this awesomely cute octet of needle felted sea creatures, each of which is tucked into an adorable little bed.

They were created for In The Palm of Your Hand, the January 2014 art exhibition at the EMP Collective in Baltimore, Maryland.

[via Laughing Squid]